Chapter 5, Freud’s Dream – Part 5

Sigmund_Freud_LIFEThis is a continuation of my review of Ahmed Osman’s book Lost City of Exodus. The introductory is here. Chapter 4 was intentionally left without a review.

In the fifth chapter, Osman informs his readers that Sigmund Freud, a world-famous scholar and Austrian neurologist, also of Jewish background, agrees with the historical account of Manetho.
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Chapter 2, Who Wrote the Exodus Story – Part 3

In the second chapter, Osman begins discussing the authenticity of the narratives outlined in the Book of Exodus. The authorship of Exodus has been debated for hundreds of years with no real consensus on the matter.

Osman relates information regarding how some scholars have indicated that the Book of Exodus may very well have been composed by more than one author, over a long period of time.
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Book Review: The Lost City of Exodus – Part 2

Chapter 1, The Story of the Exodus

Osman starts out with providing a backdrop for the reader with the Biblical narrative concerning Abraham and Sarah arriving in Egypt. He then shares the narrative concerning Joseph in the Pharaohs house, being falsely accused of rape and being sent to prison.

Osman shows that this particular Pharaoh, as the Bible indicates, “did not know Joseph,” and thus decided to oppress the Israelites who had already been residing as shepherds and farmers in Egypt. This is the king of Egypt that became the Pharaoh of Oppression. “It was this new Pharaoh, who didn’t know Joseph, who enslaved the Children of Israel by putting them to hard labor.” {page 18} See Exodus 1:11, 14.
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Book Review: The Lost City of Exodus – Part 1

lost-city-of-exodus-book-spreadThe Book’s Prologue and Introduction

In the prologue, Osman shares his frustrations with various scholars who, although they could see some of the overwhelming evidence which he had presented, one by one they refused to work with him due to a conflict between the evidence and their personal religious beliefs or ideologies and biases.

Osman also shares with his readers what was obviously a very angry Zahi Hawass, an Egyptian archaeologist and former Minister of State for Antiquities Affairs. Hawass was unable to agree with Osman’s conclusions due to political and anti-Semitic reasons, which is often the case with other historians and scientists. Many have spoken of Hawass’ pride and arrogance. Hawass is known in the media for throwing tantrums and attempting to control others. Anyone who has worked directly with him, or had brief conversations with him, know this to be true. But enough on that subject.
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